Inner Work Exercises and Meditations During Corona: Part 1

by | April 07, 2020

Dr. Zwig Inner Work Exercises and Contemplations

Small charitable donations from many people go a long way.

There are so many heroes working tirelessly to help us during this crisis.

Here are some organizations on the front lines that need our help:

Feeding America
feedingamerica.org

Meals on Wheels
mealsonwheelsamerica.org

Homeless Shelters
homelessshelterdirectory.org/contact

Direct Relief
directrelief.org/emergency/coronavirus-outbreak/

GlobalGiving
globalgiving.org/projects/coronavirus-relief-fund

Dr. Zwig Inner Work Exercises and Contemplations

If you’re waiting to go back to your life as usual you’ve missed the point.

A crisis means something has to change.

We have to deconstruct life as it has been and re-vision it in a new way.

We have to reassess, reexamine, recreate our inner and outer lives.

We have to wake up and acknowledge what we’ve been avoiding, marginalizing, and pretending not to see.

On a global level, we need to search our hearts for the compassion that can overcome our toxic disregard for our fellow humans and for the Earth.

We must challenge ourselves to grow from this.

It’s a calling. Don’t ignore it.

Dr. Zwig Inner Work Exercises and Contemplations

Lonely isolation hurts but you can use it to develop your superpowers.

Feeling all alone is a disorienting and painful experience. It’s like floating in the abyss, lost and abandoned.

But it’s also a powerful communication from your subconscious showing you an inner state of disconnection that wants to be healed.

With people and distractions around, we never have to confront the ways in which we disconnect from our deeper feelings, needs, and true purpose in life.

This is why spiritual traditions have long made use of intentional isolation in order to raise one’s awareness to a higher level.

Native American custom was to send young men and women into the wilderness alone without food and water to search for a vision of their life’s purpose.

Every tradition has its own version of this.

We’re in a situation in which isolation has been forced upon us.

We have the choice to let it victimize us or to use it as our personal crucible.

Try this:

Meditate on a time when you felt incredibly well—happy, connected, and at peace.

Re-access it by seeing yourself in that time, feeling what it felt like, and exploring the experience.

Claim it as your inner state of being right now.

Relate to yourself from this positive state of mind.

How does it deal with feeling lonely and isolated?

This sense of wholeness and connectedness is something you can cultivate independent of people and the world.

Practice it daily.

When things get back to normal you’ll have developed an inner superpower.

Dr. Zwig Inner Work Exercises and Contemplations

Don’t be victimized by fear. Process and transform it.⁣⁣

Most of the things we’re afraid of never happen, but the fear can mess up our lives.⁣⁣

Learning to process it is crucial.⁣⁣

If preventive measures and rational explanations don’t quash your worries, work on the fear as an inner growth process.⁣⁣

The best way to do this is to go into it rather than run from it.⁣⁣

You can even do it with something as scary and taboo as death!⁣⁣

Death is our most basic angst, and therefore potentially our greatest teacher.⁣⁣

For millennia spiritual traditions have used death as the great advisor.⁣⁣

To deal with fear of death we have to break the taboo against focusing on it, which only serves to make us feel spooked and scared.⁣⁣

A death fear, unless based on an absolute, imminent threat, means your process is asking you to wake up to something new in your life.⁣⁣

Something in you needs to die, and something needs to be born—a way of being, an attitude, a way of relating, etc.⁣⁣

Right now, the whole world is being asked to change and grow in this way.⁣⁣

Try this (but don’t do it if you suffer from chronic depressed or anxious moods):⁣⁣

Lie down, close your eyes, and breathe slowly and deeply.⁣⁣

Imagine you die.⁣⁣

Follow your experience with your awareness. (Forget rationalizing about whether awareness carries on after death; this exercise is for processing your fear while you’re alive).⁣⁣

Imagine you’re a dead spirit.⁣⁣

Notice what you feel and see.⁣⁣

Is it freedom? Relief? Love? Power? Creativity? Just being? A Zen state? Playfulness and fun? God? Connection to the cosmos?⁣⁣

Ask yourself how you can bring this experience into your life.⁣⁣

Look back at your alive self and give yourself some sage advice about how you should live, what you need to change, and how you should do it.⁣⁣

There’s inherent purpose in processes that make us afraid; they’re meant to shock us out of our complacency, and wake us up to new awareness.

Dr. Zwig

©2020 Dr. Adam Zwig

Meet Dr. Adam Zwig—psychologist-musician, educator, and author. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology, has had 9 Top Ten hit singles on the U.S Adult Contemporary charts, and is an internationally renowned workshop leader and lecturer. He has been featured on Billboard, Forbes, Sirius XM Radio, Huffington Post, and many other media outlets, and has over 80 million views on YouTube. Dr Zwig has released 7 albums and his songs can regularly be heard on NBC, Fox, and Fuel TV. His forthcoming book, Music in the Mayhem: Tales of Total Transformation from a Rock n Roll Psychotherapist, shows how life problems are not pathological but rather personal growth processes trying to happen. His podcast, The Dr. Zwig Show, posts new episodes every Tuesday.

DISCLAIMER: The content contained herein is for inspirational, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Nowhere in this Blog does Dr. Zwig diagnose or treat a viewer with any kind of psychological, mental, emotional or physical disorder as might be diagnosed and treated by a personal psychologist or other professional advisor. The content is not intended to be a substitute for working with a therapist but is for the purpose of educating the viewer about new approaches to working on personal problems. Viewers should use this Blog at their own risk, with the understanding that Dr. Zwig is not liable for its impact or effect on its users. Viewing this Blog does not form a practitioner/client relationship between the viewer and Dr. Zwig. Dr. Zwig is not responsible for any action taken by a viewer based upon any information in this Blog. Never disregard professional medical advice or stop taking psychiatric medication based on something you have read on this Blog without a doctor’s supervision and ongoing therapeutic support. Dr. Zwig is an educator, author, and life coach in the U.S., and a psychotherapist in Switzerland. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology. He is also a rock n roll musician.